Category Archives: repression

March 18th: Day of International Solidarity With Russian Prisoners

March 18th: Day of International Solidarity With Russian Prisoners

On March 18th Bristol ABC hosted an info night talk along with the screening of the film “Sad But True: Ivan.In Memory of Our Friend.” a link to the film can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_pfgPf3PG0

Information from Russian comrades on the torture of antifascist prisoners and a call for solidarity follows:

During last months Russian secret services have arrested several
anarchists and antifascists in Penza and Saint-Petersburg cities. They
were accused with creation of “terrorist organization”. Arrested people
was tortured with electric cables and shockers during many hours,
brutally beaten without paying any care to make hard damage and visible
traces of beating. Officers humiliated our arrested comrades. They tried
to force them make evidences and accusations against themselves and
against each other. These true Gestapo actions of Russian FSB secret
service can call only vigorous protest from every honest person who can
only learn the truth about the situation.

At the same time with arrests in Saint-Petersburg raids and arrests by
FSB against anarchists were made in Crimea.
The international solidarity action week of February 7-12 exposed wide
reaction of the libertarian movement worldwide to these terrible
repressions and made huge informational effect in Russia. But it
appeared to be not enough to overcome the situation. Very soon the
information was published that some of arrested anarchists were again
tortured and intimidated. They were demanded by FSB officers to refuse
to participate in campaign of resistance against tortures and
repressions. More – after solidarity actions in Russia police launched
repressions against its participants. Comrades were prosecuted in Moscow
and Chelyabinsk cities. Anarchists in Chelyabinsk were tortured with
electricity by police while accused with “hooliganism” (!)

It is necessary to continue and strengthen the campaign of solidarity to
force Russian authorities to end tortures and political repressions. The
best day for new actions is March 18 – the day of presidential elections
in Russia. In this day ruling regime is the most vulnerable and the eyes
of the world will be turned to the situation in our country.

We urgently and desperately call to all anarchist, leftist, antifascist
and democratic groups and communities all over the world to organize
actions of protest and resistance of any kind against tortures and
repressions in Russia by the embassies, consulates and other official
offices of Russian Federation in your countries.

The arrested will also be delighted to recieve letters of support. Here are their addresses:

St. Petersburg:

191123, St. Petersburg, Shpalernaya St., 25 PKU SIZO-3 of the Federal Penitentiary Service of Russia

Shishkin Igor Dmitrievich
Filinkov Victor Sergeevich

In Penza:

PKU SIZO-1, st. Karakozova, 30, Penza, Penza region, Russia, 440039

Shakursky Ilya Alexandrovich

Pchelintsev Dmitry Dmitrievich

Chernov Andrey Sergeevich

Sagynbaev Arman Dauletovich

You can also donate to their legal costs here

For an update/review of state repression in russia read this avtonom.org/en/news/review-repressions-…

****

My Mouth Was Full of Blood, and One of the Torturers Stuck My Sock in It”

On February 6, 2018, attorney Oleg Zaitsev visited Dmitry Pchelintsev and interviewed him. Like most of the defense attorneys in the case, the investigator made Zaitsev sign a non-disclosure agreement concerning evidence in the preliminary investigation. Zaitsev notes that, under the circumstances, he has not violated investigatory privileges, but nevertheless he felt obliged to discuss all the violations of rights his client has suffered. What follows is a transcript of his interview with Pchelintsev.

I can say the following. On October 27, 2017, I left the house at around six o’clock in the morning to meet my grandmother. Near the end wall of the building, as I was nearing my car, four men in plain clothes suddenly approached me. I was so surprised I put my hands up in front of me. These men immediately beat me up and threw me on the ground. Their faces were not covered. I could identify them. Later, some of them escorted me from the remand prison to the FSB office. One of them looked to be thirty-five years old. He had light-brown hair, was wearing a gray jacket, and had a stout face and thickset build. They asked me my surname and struck various parts of my body. They reproached me for having putting up my dukes when I was being detained by the FSB. They confiscated the keys to my flat and used them to enter the place when my girlfriend was sleeping and search the place.

On October 28, 2017, after the court had remanded me in custody to the remand prison on Karakozov Street, I was in solidarity confinement cell 5-1. It was around four o’clock in the afternoon when a special forces policeman, the senior shift officer, and a major from the local office of the Russian Federal Penitentiary Service entered my cell. They told me to exit the cell and go to the nearby punishment cell, which I did. Six or seven men immediately entered the cell. Half of them were in MultiCam camouflage uniforms, while the other half were in plain clothes. But all of them wore balaclavas. Despite the headgear concealing their faces, I could identify some of these people by their voices, physique, and clothes. Subsequently, I recognized some of them when I was being transported and escorted.

They told me what to do, and I followed their orders. I stripped to my shorts, sat down on a bench, stretched my arms backwards, and put my head down. At first, I thought this was some examination everyone sent to the remand prison had to undergo, so I voluntarily submitted to it. Then they taped my hands behind me, tied one of my legs to the foot of the bench with more tape, and stuck a wad of gauze in my mouth.

One of the men was wearing white rubber medical gloves. He took out a dynamo and set it on a table. He stripped two wires with a boxcutter and told me to stick out my big toe. Another man checked my pulse by touching my neck. He would subsequently do this more than once: he was monitoring my condition. He was surprised my pulse was normal and I was not agitated. That was because I did not realize at first what was happening.

Then the man in gloves cranked the dynamo. The current flowed to my knees. My calf muscles contracted, and I was seized by paralytic pain. I screamed. My back and head convulsed against the wall. They put a jacket between my naked body and the stone wall. This went on for about ten seconds, but when it was happening, it felt like an eternity to me.

One of them spoke to me.

I don’t know the word ‘no.’ I don’t remember it. You should forget it. You got me?” he said literally.

Yes,” I replied.

That’s the right answer. Attaboy, Dimochka,” he said.

The gauze was stuck in my mouth again, and I was shocked four times, three seconds each time. […] Then I was tossed onto the floor. Since one of my legs was tied to the foot of the bench, when I fell, I seriously banged up my knees, which bled profusely. My shorts were pulled off. I was lying on my stomach. They tried to attach the wires to my genitals. I screamed and asked them to stop brutalizing me.

You’re the leader,” they repeated.

Yes, I’m the leader,” I said to make them stop torturing me.

You planned terrorist attacks.”

Yes, we planned terrorist attacks,” I would reply.

One of the men who measured my pulse put his balaclava on me so I would not see them. At one point, I lost consciousness for awhile. […]After they left, a Federal Penitentiary Service officer entered the room and told me to get dressed. He took me back to my solitary confinement cell.

The next day, October 20, 2018, I broke the tank on the toilet and used the shards to slash my arms at the wrists and elbows, and my neck in order to stop the torture. There was a lot of blood from the cuts on my clothes and the floor, and I collapsed onto the floor. They probably saw what I did via the CCTV camera installed in the cell. Prison staffers entered my cell and gave me first aid. Then the prison’s psychologist, Vera Vladimirovna, paid me a visit.

As regards the video cameras installed in my cell, as well as in the punishment cell and the corridor, I can say that when FSB officers show up, the cameras either are turned off or the recording is later erased, or something is done with the sensors. The FSB officers completely control the local Federal Penitentiary Service officers.

On November 8, 2017, at around five o’clock in the afternoon, the senior shift officer was getting ready to leave.

Will everything be alright with me?” I asked him.

Don’t worry, I’ll be right back,” he replied.

I had connected his departure with the fact that the last time he left, the day before, Saginbayev’s scream was audible on the floor. I realized he was being tortured. Later, our paths crossed, and he apologized for testifying against me.

A lieutenant from the Federal Penitentiary Service then came to my door.

Am I safe here?” I wrote on a piece of paper that I showed to him.

Yes,” he replied in big letters.

After that I showed him the enormous bruise on my chest and stomach to let him know I had been tortured. After awhile he opened the cell door, and four men wearing prisoner’s uniforms dashed into the cell. Civilian clothes were visible under these uniforms, all of which were baggy. They were all wearing what looked like Buff masks, black tube scarves.

They beat and kicked me in the stomach, kidneys, and head. I had bruises from their blows, but they hit me like in a gym, so they would leave fewer visible traces. They informed me they were from the “underworld committee”: because of me they had been put on lockdown. They gave me a week to solve my problems with the “pigs.” If I didn’t solve them, they would punk me. One of them filmed the whole thing on a smartphone. The Federal Penitentiary Service officer was outside in the hallway the entire time. The four FSB guys from the “underworld committee” left. Later, I also recognized some of them when I was being escorted and transported.

Then the senior shift officer, a captain, returned.

How can I believe you when FSB guys just came into my cell and beat me up?” I asked him.

He looked puzzled.

Afterwards, FSB agents have visited me many times in the remand prison. They wear no masks and chat with me in the visiting room. When they talk with me, they exert psychological pressure on me. They threaten, blackmail, and manipulate me. 

During an interrogation, the investigator told me it was he who gave the agents permission to visit me. They took their orders from him and they had their own work.

After I tried to commit suicide by slashing my veins open, I was put under special watch in the remand prison. The cuffs are not removed from my hands even when I am signing interrogation reports.

I want to add that, when I was tortured with electrical shocks, my mouth was full of “crushed teeth” due to the fact I gritted my teeth since the pain was strong, and I tore the frenulum of my tongue. My mouth was full of blood, and at some point one of my torturers stuck my sock in my mouth. 

I was beaten so badly I had open wounds on my head.”

****

Repression in Autumn 2017

In October-November 2017, officers of the Federal Security Service in the Penza region arrested six young people (from 20 to 27 years). Arman Sagynbaev, Dmitry Pchelintsev, Ilya Shakursky, Yegor Zorin, Vasily Kuksov and Andrei Chernov were placed in the pretrial detention center in Penza. In January 2018, Ilya Kapustin (later released, now he is a witness in the case), Viktor Filinkov and Igor Shishkin were detained in St. Petersburg. According to the investigation, all the detainees were members of the terrorist group “Network,” which allegedly was engaged in preparing the overthrow of the authorities. Young people are charged under art. 205.4 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation (“Organization of a terrorist community and participation in it”). There were no public actions on behalf of the “Network.” It is known that the accused took interest in strikeball, training for survival in extreme conditions, trekking, and role-playing games.  Some of the defendants are activists of anti-fascist, environmental and anarchist movements, others were not included in the public activity, but were familiar with these activists. Information on the participation of the accused in violent actions against citizens or state institutions does not exist. Most of the detainees gave confessions, and all of them were charged with participation in the terrorist community (Part 2, Article 205.4 of the Criminal Code). It was later found out that the testimony was obtained under torture.

  1.  Viktor Filinkov was tortured after his detention at Pulkovo airport on January 23, 2018 and after medical examination in hospital No. 26 in St. Petersburg. Victor Filinkov was placed in a minivan in handcuffs and a cap, stretched over his face, after which the FSB officers inflicted a significant number of blows to him in the chest, back, nape, and used electric shock. Electric shocks were applied to the leg, neck, groin, nape, parietal area of the head, and also to the handcuffs. The presence of bruises, abrasions and traces of the electric shock on Filinkov’s body was recorded by members of the Public Observation Commission of St. Petersburg.  Filinkov’s torture was accompanied by threats of even more painful torture (electric shock to the genitals), psychological pressure on Filinkov, and threats of using violence against his wife. On January 27, 2018 Viktor Filinkov filed an application for a crime against the actions of the FSB in the Military Prosecutor’s Office. In early February 2018 it was answered that this message had been forwarded to the FSB for consideration. The results are currently unknown.
  2. FSB officers kidnapped Igor Shishkin on January 25, 2018 while he was walking his dog. The location of Shishkin remained unknown for two days. Despite the fact that Shishkin refused to write a statement about application of torture to him, it is obvious that he was subjected to them. Unknown people broke the bottom wall of the orbit of Shishkin’s eyes in the period of January 25-27, 2018, which was diagnosed by medical officers of pre-trial detention ward No. 3 in St. Petersburg.  On January 27, 2018 in pre-trial detention ward No. 3  Shishkin was visited by  the members of the St. Petersburg POC, which recorded numerous injuries, identified as traces of torture (bruises, wounds, burns from an electric shocker). Medical assistance was being given to Igor Shishkin only after the lawyer of the “Public Verdict” appealed to the ECHR.
  3. Ilya Kapustin was detained on January 25, 2018 in St. Petersburg on his way home. Five FSB officers drove Kapustin to the ground, dragged him into the mini van, handcuffed him, tightening it with such force that Kapustin’s brushes were cut. Within 4 hours Kapustin was asked about his membership in political organizations, visits to Penza, and political activities of his acquaintances while he was constantly struck with electric shocks in the groin and in the abdomen.  Traces of electric shocks on the body of Ilya Kapustin are recorded by an act of forensic medical examination dated 29.01.2018 and photographs submitted by a lawyer. On February 13, 2018 Kapustin filed an allegation of torture with the Investigative Committee. The results of the verification are not known at this time.
  4. Dmitry Pchelintsev was detained in Penza on October 27, 2017. The detention was accompanied by a beating. On October 28, 2017 Pchelintsev was subjected to electric shocks in the cell of the Penza pre-trial detention ward to obtain confessions. On October 29, he broke the tank from the toilet and cut his hands on the folds and neck with shrapnel, after which the detention facility employees were forced to call a doctor and provide medical assistance. Torture after that ceased for a while, but FSB officers constantly visited Pchelintsev, threatened violence against him and his wife, who lives in Penza.  Dmitry Pchelintsev refused to admit guilt and talked about his torture during a poll made by lawyer Oleg Zaitsev on February 6, 2018. But after attracting the attention of the media to torture in relation to Pchelintsev and the publication of the announcement of a press conference in Moscow with the participation of Zaitsev’s lawyer, the tortures resumed, and Pchelintsev renounced his statements.
  5. Ilya Shakursky was detained in Penza on October 19, 2017 and taken to the FSB for interrogation. During this interrogation, staff struck at the back of his head and also pronounced numerous threats – from rape to life for organization of the terrorist community. Later interrogations continued in the pre-trial detention ward, and during one of them Shakursky was subjected to electric shocks. During this interrogation, Shakursky was threatened with continued violence if he had new lawyers or human rights activists.  Shakursky reported on torture during a lawyer’s poll conducted by lawyer Anatoly Vakhterov on 12.02.2018. However, after 16.02.2018 the beatings of Shakursky by FSB officers in Penza’s pretrial detention facility resumed, the defendant confirmed earlier evidence about his guilt and refused to file an application for torture.
  6. Vasiliy Kuksov was also detained in Penza on October 19, 2017. The violence applied to him is known from Ilya Shakursky’s lawyer’s questioning and Elena Kuksova’s wife’s messages. According to Shakursky, he saw Kuksov with a bloodied face during interrogations of FSB officers. Kuksova’s wife Elena saw him when the detainee was brought home for a search: his clothes were torn and dirty in blood, and his forehead and nose were broken.
  7. Yegor Zorin was detained in Penza on October 17 or 18, 2017, for more than a day his friends and relatives did not know about his whereabouts. Zorin was placed under arrest in Penza’s pretrial detention facility, but in December 2017 was transferred to house arrest.
  8. Arman Sagynbaev and Andrei Chernov were detained in early November 2017 in St. Petersburg and Moscow, respectively. According to lawyers, Sagynbaev and Chernov admit guilt and give testimony to other members of the alleged terrorist community. There is every reason to believe that these statements were also given under torture.  Arman Sagynbaev, who is in pre-trial detention facilities of Penza, wrote a statement refusing any “outside” contacts, including with human rights activists and members of the Public Observation Commission. According to Dmitry Pchelintsev, during transportation to investigative actions, he was in a car with Sagynbaev, and in the course of their conversation Sagynbaev told Pchelintsev about the use of torture against him.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

£500 raised for antifa and anarchist prisoners facing repression in Russia

A benefit show took place this Thursday raising £500 (39,000 rubles) for anarchist and antifascists in Russia!

The money will go to legal costs relating to the police raids and arrests of anarchists and antifascists in St. Petersburg and Penza, Russia. Read more about the repression here: https://avtonom.org/…/support-anarchist-and-antifa-prisoner…

Solidarity from Bristol! Until all prisons are destroyed!

Download the flyer here:  russian soli

Antifenix pamphlet. The Fenix verdict: Defendants acquitted

Check out this pdf produced by comrades in the Czech Republic…3 years of lack of evidence – 3 years that fucked up our lives (DOWNLOAD .PDF FILE HERE)

The Fenix case uproar, consists of a lot of accusations of many crimes, ranging from the one of so-called “promotion of terrorism” to the one of preparation of terrorist attacks. These are the ones that were most discussed at the latest Municipal Court Hearing in Prague. During their verdict, the judge acquitted all the five defendants of the Fenix 1 case. Is it a victory? Why this decision isn’t final? Followed article is a translation of a month old overview over the court hearings and some analyses of our situation and experience, originally written in Czech language.

This long court hearing was about five anarchists, three of them accused of plotting a terrorist attack on a train carrying military paraphernalia. Two of them were accused of knowing about such plans and not having stopped the presumed authors. Two of these five people were also accused of preparing an attack with Molotov cocktails on police cars during the eviction of the Cibulka squat. Basically, according to the deployed police agents, there are in total five people and three different crimes involved. (And all this is just for Fenix 1, because some of these people are facing further accusations in the context of Fenix 2).
In the group where the five accused were involved, there were two police agent
infiltrators. These two individuals actively prepared both attacks and they also
partly started them up. However, the judge did not identify their actions as a provocation just because the materials that would detect the provocation are not available.

The Judge, Her Hon. Hana Hrncirova, stressed that she acquitted all the defendants precisely because of lack of sufficient evidence. She highlighted the lack of transparency of police’s work: “The reason why the court took such decision is the fact that during the evidence assessment the judge expressed strong doubts over the police transparency in their methods both before the commencement of the criminal prosecution and when it was legally permitted to involve the deployed agents in the case,” she said.
The judge stressed that the police acted without having a warrant for months and when the defense attorney asked for the records of their activity, the police did not have them: ” The court has no trace of such records, not even one” the judge said. Then she said: “The Defense attorney has tried to get these materials because it can be assumed that, on the grounds of these individual permits, there must be some records somewhere. Such records were never included in the file.”

According to what the police said, the materials from the first months of infiltration “are not existing or cannot be used”. Then, we have another stack of files that are existing, files with a transcript of taped down cell phone communication, and can indeed be used. Especially to prove that the secret agents, the infiltration and the construction of the case are not a matter of the past as we hear very often. Comic was the moment, when the judge raised this stack over her head (it is a volume of about 400 A4 pages) and said that from all these transcripts not a single thing has any value as evidence.

The decision is not final because the state prosecutor Pazourek felt that he still has not destroyed people’s life enough and appealed on site. As a former police officer, he believes that the police has acted correctly and hopes that the higher Court of Appeal will confirm his opinion. Surely, he will do his utmost best to find something that “must be there and can be used”. We can then just hope that this hunter of anarchists (who is also the one who proposed at least 12 years in jail for charged ones in Fenix) and also plays role in Fenix 2 will have elements with no value of evidence in the next trial as well.

Unlike Pazourek, The Minister of inferior, gun lover, social democrat, Josef Chovanec, does not have time to wait for the Higher court. The Parliamentary Elections are approaching and he has to give priority to polishing his image, presenting himself as a fair and just daddy. And therefore, after three years, he has suddenly noticed that in the Fenix case something “is not quite right”. In his “Twitter” profile he dropped a few comments by making reference to facts belonging to Czech history: “If it proves, that it was just police provocation, I will ask for a thorough investigation case and a punishment of the culprits. The police of such a democratic state […] cannot arbitrarily destroy the lives of people, and this is regardless of their political thinking.. I hope that the “Omladina trial [1]” belongs to our history and not to our present.” Too bad that he was not there saying such words when, at the time of Martin Ignacak’s imprisonment, main detective Palfiova, looking at the file, stated: “we can do everything!”.

Whether Chovanec himself is directly and or partly responsible for the process against the anarchist movement or not, we do not know and it will take long time before we find out. Surely, if the court would sent the five people behind bars we can bet that he will tap his guys’ shoulders “for the good job they have done”. Now, when the contrary happened, he can blame for their mistakes and abuse of power just a couple of individuals out of a police and punitive apparatus that is otherwise “spotless” and “helpful to all the community”.

The lack of evidence wins
For many of us the Court’s verdict is a relief. For a moment we can breathe, meet up for dinner, and see our friends in a more relaxed state of mind outside the prison walls. These moments are important in life and it is good that we can enjoy them. Prison is a useless institution, it divides relationships, isolates people and destroys lives. This is why the verdict, no matter how much more pleasant than “guilty”, is not a total win for us. We do not forget what three years of infiltration and later investigation meant. Ales, Martin, and Peter have all been incarcerated for 27 months in total, Lukas – 7 months, and before that he had been one year underground. All of them with still awaiting trials (appeal of Fenix 1 and for some of them and two more comrades Fenix 2) Some of them with possible life sentences still in the air. Let’s not forget about Igor, who is today found innocent, was in the hardest custody for three months, is still facing hard restrictions and had been reporting to the probation services for almost year and a half. On top of that, he is still at risk of deportation from the Czech Republic due by his stay in custody.

The families, friends and closest people of the defendants and imprisoned, as well as those who are directly affected by the Fenix case, are facing a great deal of emotional pressure and separation. The Police broke in in several flats and has been taking more and more people for interrogations. The police is using practices in their powers such as taking people to the forest, threatening the partners and the parents of the suspects. A list of what has been done during the various repressive actions (and we are only talking about the last three years on the anti-authoritarian scene in so called Czech Republic) would probably be long and scary.

In short, it is clear that there is nothing to celebrate. The need to smash the oppressive system is still in the game, just there is need to think about a better strategy and find new ways how to fight. In cases like the Fenix, it is necessary to understand what this is really about. From the very beginning, we said that the police is not primarily after long imprisonments of single anarchists. The Repressive units are not afraid of us alone, nor they dont’t fear of Martin, Peter, Sasha, Ales, Katarína, Radka, Igor, Lukas, Ales and the other defendants. What scares them is that more and more people would come out by identifying with our ideas, especially if they start using a wider variety of tactics. The protectors of the status quo invest a lot of strengths, energy and resources to keep people in the belief that this is the freedom they dream for.

Anti-authoritarian and anarchists people that believe that we can live our lives in a more genuine way than the one offered by neo-liberalism and that we do not need State and Politics, can offer an alternative which could interfere with this consumerist life-style. Repression is then seen as the ideal tool to suppress ideas. And by them the state apparatus wants to discredit us through sensationalist media and labeling us as terrorists, to intimidate us by using imprisonment and to divide the movement between “the radicals” and the “the nonviolent ones” and place us against each other. Paralyze us with paranoia.

The question is where this attempt of repression is successful and in which points we can work on ourselves. How not to fall into traps that are invisible at first sight and how to tear down walls in our heads. The walls inside ourselves and between us and other people. How to break these walls and build bridges out of them. How to overcome fear, obtain what are fighting for and respect each other. And last but not least, how not to fall in the urge of winning in a game that is not ours and which only takes us away from important things and activities.

The Fenix case has become a crucial point in the lives of many of us. We can learn a lot from it. Take it as a point of reference to better understand how the power structures work and to understand each others as well as to critically analyze our own mistakes. We do not want to pretend that we have the answers to all the questions out there. But we have learned one thing. If we want our actions and our organizing to be really effective and dangerous for the structures of oppression that keep us under control, these must come from collective discussions and negotiations that go beyond the outlines given by the state. We learned that there is no point to hide from repression, it is better to be ready to face it and create conditions that will make such operations inactive. As long as people are put in jail first and it is discussed whether this is the right measure to implement or not only after the imprisonment, there is a reason to keep on fighting. That is not to say that if the legal proceedings happen in the opposite order the issue is solved, rather that we need to imagine an entirely different world. A world without prisons, borders and police where we must really solve the problems ourselves rather then hidding them behind the walls.

Fenix is not an operation targeting a few naive anarchists, but an attack to the future of subversion as a whole. It is also a demonstration of Police power and of the work of the secret state agents in democracy we hear as synonymous to freedom so often.

Do not get caught!

In Solidarity, Anarchist Black Cross, Prague, Autumn Equinox 2017.

“My pillar values are: Life, Justice, Freedom, and Equality. People who construct cases and want to imprison people hardly understand such values. I am ready for any verdict, and I will take it holding my head high. A verdict that will affect my life and the life of others.”
End of Martin Ignacak’s Final Speech.

Notes:

[1]In 1894, the Omladina Trial, convened in the Austro-Hungarian regional capital of Prague, ostensibly placed Czech Anarchism and Anarcho-syndicalism before the court as well as specifically convicting 68 Czech Nationalists of radical activities. (Source: Wikipedia)

Azerbaijan: torture and 12 years of prison for anarchist graffiti

"Joyeux journée des esclaves"On May 10, 2016, two anarchists Bayram Mammadov and Giyas Ibrahimov were arrested by police in Baku for tagging a monument dedicated to the glory of former president, and father of the current one, Heydar Aliyev. The graffiti said “Fuck the system” and “Happy slave day”. These were painted on the evening before Aliyev’s birthday, which is a holiday in support of the state in Azerbaijan. Just tagging the statue would have earned a year in prison, but that was not enough for the police who also charged them with carrying a kilo of heroin each. Bayram was arrested around 2.30 pm as he was photographing the graffiti, and was taken to the police station where he was beaten and threatened to be raped with a stick until he signed a confession, including for drugs. He was then offered a deal: apologise by laying flowers in front of the Aliyev monument and in front of the television. The next day, he was brought in front of a judge and asked to give names of other people who were involved. The humiliations and beatings continued for several days, sometimes filmed by the police.

On the 25th of October Giyas Ibrahimov was sentenced to 10 years in prison. Bayrams trial is still outstanding, but it is to be expected that his sentence will be between eight and twelve years imprisonment. Both anarchists suffer heavy repression and torture in the prison.

qiyas-ibrahimov-tribunalWe call for solidarity with the both concerned comrades!
Freedom for Bayram and Giyas!
Freedom for all prisoners!

Get more information, and listen to Giyas’s sentencing statement, here.

More anarchists arrested in Italy

At dawn on September 6, a police operation in Turin led to the raids of around thirty houses and arrests of five anarchists, who were then charged with conspiracy to commit terrorism, in regards to the FAI. The arrestees are Anna, Marco, Sandrone, Danilo and Valentina, as well as the ongoing investigations of Nicola and Alfredo, who are already imprisoned.

The eight anarchists targeted in the police operation “Scripta Manentare in four different prisons, and in high security “AS2” wings. They are all in isolation, but can receive post. Alfredo Cospito and Anna Beniamino are in hunger strike since 3 and 10 October respectively, against the isolation regime.

Here are everyone’s addresses, write to them to show that we care, and we won’t forget them!

BISESTI Marco : Strada Alessandria, 50/A – 15121 San Michele, Alessandria (AL)
MERCOGLIANO Alessandro : Strada Alessandria, 50/A – 15121 San Michele, Alessandria (AL)
BENIAMINO Anna : Via Aspromonte, 100 – 04100 – Latina LT
CREMONESE Danilo Emiliano : Str. delle Campore, 32 – 05100 Terni TR
SPEZIALE Valentina : Via Aspromonte, 100 – 04100 – Latina LT
COSPITO Alfredo et Nicola sont détenu à Ferrara AS2
CORTELLI Daniele : Str. delle Campore, 32 – 05100 Terni TR

L'opération policière "Scripta Manent"

Another Anarchist in Jail

On Sunday, September 4th, police captured our comrade Lukáš Borl. Lukáš is an anarchist who has lived in underground for about a year, due to previous intense surveillance. On Monday September 5th the court sent him to custody jail. State attorney, Naďa Voláková, commented on the case for the Czech News Agency: “I confirm the capture of a man who is accused of foundation, supporting and promoting a movement aimed at suppressing human rights and freedoms, black mail and misdemeanor of criminal damage…”

We do not yet know what exactly Lukáš is accused of. We will continue to provide updates. So far you can support him by sending a letter or by a spontaneous noise demonstration. Lukáš is held in a custody jail in the city of Litoměřice. Here is the address:

Lukáš Borl 1.3.1982
Vazební věznice Litoměřice
Veitova 1
412 81 Litoměřice

antifenix.cz
anarchistblackcross.cz

IMPRISONED ANARCHIST MARTIN IGNAČÁK HAS GONE ON HUNGER STRIKE

On Friday 27.5. 2016 in Pankrác remand prison anarchist Martin Ignačák accused of terrorism went on hunger strike. He did this because on 29.4.2016 the City court in Prague ruled in favour of his release from remand and the state’s attorney appealed this decision to the High court in Prague. On friday 27.5. 2016 the High court in Prague extended the remand. Therefore the anarchist has decided to protest by going on hunger strike and has stopped taking in nutrition and liquids. This type of hunger strike threatens the life of the hunger striker after a week.

During the year long investigation of the preparation of a supposed terrorist attack the imprisoned anarchist has exhausted all legal options, to achieve objective procedure of the respective organs active in the criminal proceedings. None of them were taken into account. This is why he now chose this radical form of expression, to draw attention to this manipulated police case. ” I consider the approach of the
investigators and the police to be very problematic, it is a threat to the freedom of every human being, a threat to freedom of speech, a threat to activism that tries to lead to a better world , and this doesn’t just involve anarchists.”

Martin is being prosecuted in the so called Fénix case from April 2015, in which altogether 5 people were accused of the preparation and the failure to notify of a terrorist attack on a train. Martin is the only one who has been in remand prison this whole time and his detention has now been extended after the intervention of the state’s attorney. As a reason for the extension of remand the state’s attorney used the testimony of a police agent who infiltrated the anarchist movement in 2014. From his testimony the state’s attorney drew the conclusion that
Martin might attempt to escape to Spain. Another reason, according to him, was that Martin ” is connected to the so called Síť revolučních buněk/ The Network of Revolutionary Cells (SRB) and therefore also to similar organizations abroad.” The police spoke about SRB when they began Fénix and provided information to the media. ” Any connections between the 5 attacks ascribed to SRB and all the detained and accused
have been refuted. The investigators themselves have ruled it out” says Martin.

At the moment Martin is the second longest detained prisoner in the Pankrác remand prison. For 13 months he lives there under conditions, that negatively affect his psychological and physical state. For example he has been refused food free of animal products, which means he practically doesn’t have access to hot food. Friends, who have come to visit him have been mentioned by name in the indictment. Police from the Department for combating organized crime have started to collect information on Martin’s sister, only because she tries to support her brother in whichever way she can.

For Martin parole would mean that after 13 long months he would again see his friends, family, nature, that he wouldn’t be exposed to emotional deprivation and physical hardship.

Update Sunday, May 29th: Martin’s sister Pavla B. joined her brother in the protest and this morning she has started hunger strike herself as well.

For more information follow antifenix.noblogs.org